Food drive

February 7, 2007 

  • The Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina reacts immediately to serve victims of hurricanes and floods throughout the southeast.

Donating food is easy. Just look for collection bins at Harris Teeter stores throughout the region, starting April 1.

On Feed the Need day, Saturday, April 26, you can also bring your donations to volunteers at select Harris Teeters:
Cary
Harris Teeter @ Crescent Commons - 2080 Kildaire Farm Rd.

Clayton
Harris Teeter @ Flowers Plantation - 67 Flowers Crossroads Way

Durham
Harris Teeter @ Hope Valley Commons - corner of Garrett and W. Hwy 54.

Raleigh
Harris Teeter @ Falls Pointe - 9600 Falls of Neuse Road
Harris Teeter @ Leesville Towne Center - 13210 Strickland Road
. Check back here for specifics.

You can donate online : here.

What should you donate?

The Food Bank needs nutritious, nonperishable foods in metal or plastic containers. This year, we're emphasizing donations of foods kids like. Please consider the following items:

  • No Glass, Please!
  • Canned Meals: Stews, Soups, Tuna, Ravioli, etc. (Pop-top cans a plus!)
  • Peanut Butter
  • Cereal
  • Canned Fruits and Vegetables
  • Rice, Pasta and Dried Beans
  • Hygiene Items: Toothpaste, Shaving Items, Soap, etc.
  • Paper Products: Toilet Paper, Paper Towels, etc.
  • Infant Products: Diapers, Wipes, Formula, Infant Cereal
  • (Please - No loose glass and plastic jars of baby food as they will have to be discarded due to health regulations)

Collecting food as a group? Click here for support information from the Food Bank.

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