White House sounds alarm on warming

Report say it's here and getting worse

The Associated PressJune 17, 2009 

  • The White House report broke down global warming's effects by region, including effects that have already been seen and those expected in the future. Here's what to look for in the Southeast:

    Already: Spring rainfall is down nearly 30 percent since 1970.

    Future: Hotter summer days, polluted air, increased drought, slightly stronger hurricanes.

— Harmful effects from global warming are already here and worsening, warns the first climate report from Barack Obama's presidency in the strongest language on climate change ever to come out of the White House.

Global warming has already caused more heavy downpours, the rise of temperatures and sea levels, rapidly retreating glaciers and altered river flows, according to the document released Tuesday by the White House science adviser and other top officials.

"There are in some cases already serious consequences," report co-author Anthony Janetos of the University of Maryland told The Associated Press. "This is not a theoretical thing that will happen 50 years from now. Things are happening now."

The White House document -- a climate status report required periodically by Congress -- contains no new research. But it paints a fuller, more cohesive and darker picture of global warming in the United States than previous studies and brief updates during the George W. Bush years. Bush was ultimately forced to issue a draft report last year by a lawsuit, and that document was the basis for this new one.

One administration official, Jane Lubchenco, called the new report a game-changer. The "major disruptions" already taking place will only increase as warming continues, the authors wrote. They project the average U.S. temperature could rise 11 degrees by the end of the century.

"Thresholds will be crossed, leading to large changes in climate and ecosystems," the study said in one of its key findings, adding that such changes could affect the survival of some species.

For example, in the past few decades, winters in parts of the Midwest have warmed by several degrees and the time without frost has grown by a week, according to the report.

Shorter winters have some benefits, such as longer growing seasons, but those are changes that require adjustments just the same, the authors note.

"We're already seeing impacts across the nation," said co-author Virginia Burkett, coordinator of global change science at the U.S. Geological Survey. "The evidence is much stronger than it has been."

The report compiles years of scientific research and updates it with new data. It was produced by the interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program, relying on government, academic and research experts.

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