Palin hedges as media fish for answers

She won't rule out 2012 run

The Associated PressJuly 8, 2009 

  • At the state Capitol in Juneau, the "Time to Make a Difference" clock that counted the time left in Palin's term was taken down from the wall outside her office. And people from around the country called her office to inquire about the situation, as did a few cruise ship tourists who made the trek to the Capitol.

    Where is she? Why is she stepping down? When is her last day? Why so soon?

    A tour guide tried to politely answer the questions for the tourists when she could but for the most part had no answers.

    Some of the visitors left Palin messages in a guest log.

    "Sarah -- Please Stay!" one person wrote.

    The Associated Press

— Sarah Palin says she's not a quitter, she's a fighter, but adds that, politically speaking, "if I die, I die. So be it."

Sporting fishing waders and a T-shirt, Palin defended her decision to resign as Alaska governor in half a dozen interviews broadcast and published Tuesday morning. The former vice presidential candidate invited the media to Dillingham, an Alaska town of about 2,500, where she was fishing with her husband, Todd, and her children.

Palin wouldn't rule out a 2012 presidential run, and she told CNN that "all options are on the table" for her future.

"I don't know what doors will be open or closed by then," the Republican told Time magazine. "I was telling Todd today, I was saying, 'Man, I wish we could predict the next fish run so that we know when to be out on the water.' We can't predict the next fish run, much less what's going to happen in 2012."

But she told ABC's "Good Morning America" that she recognizes she might not have political staying power after her surprise resignation Friday, which came just as she had been expected to elevate her national profile ahead of a possible 2012 GOP presidential run.

"I said before ... 'You know, politically speaking, if I die, I die. So be it,'" she said.

"I'm not going to take the comfortable path. I'm going to take the right path for the state," she said of her resignation, which she characterized as a matter of progressing in an unconventional way.

Palin criticized President Barack Obama, a possible sign she's looking toward the 2012 presidential race.

"President Obama is growing government outrageously, and it's immoral and it's uneconomic, his plan that he tries to sell America," Palin told Time. "His plan to 'put America on the right track' economically, incurring the debt that our nation is incurring, trillions of dollars that we're passing on to our kids, expecting them to pay off for us, is immoral and doesn't even make economic sense."

She said that she isn't sure what her next step will be.

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