Russia finds missing ship and crew

The Associated PressAugust 18, 2009 

— The high seas mystery over the freighter Arctic Sea was far from solved Monday after the Russian navy found the ship off West Africa, far from the Algerian port where it was supposed to dock two weeks ago.

A full cargo of questions remained:

Was the ship attacked near Sweden as reported? Was this an unheard-of case of piracy in European waters? Or a murky commercial dispute? Why was the Arctic Sea found off Cape Verde, 2,000 miles from its intended port?

Defense Minister Anatoly Serdyukov informed President Dmitry Medvedev that the Russian-crewed freighter had been found safe about 300 miles from Cape Verde and that the 15 crew members were taken aboard another vessel for questioning.

The details stopped there.

Since the Arctic Sea sailed from the Finnish port of Pietarsaari on July 21 with a $1.8million cargo of timber, rumors and unconfirmed reports of misadventure has followed it.

On July 30, Swedish police said the ship's owner had reported that the crew claimed the vessel was boarded by masked men on July 24 near the Swedish island of Gotland. The invaders reportedly tied up the crew, beat them, claimed they were looking for drugs, then sped off about 12 hours later in an inflatable craft.

By the time the Swedish report emerged, the ship had already passed through the English Channel, where it made its last known radio contact on July 28. Signals from the ship's tracking device were picked up off France's coast the next day, but that was the last known trace of it until Monday.

The Arctic Sea was scheduled to make port in Algeria on Aug. 4. But after it was late by more than a week, Medvedev ordered the defense ministry to find the freighter.

A ship resembling the 320-foot Arctic Sea was rumored to have been seen in the Spanish port of San Sebastian, even though the port is suitable only for small vessels, then in the area of Cape Verde. On Saturday, a Russian maritime expert said the ship's tracking device had sprung to life off the coast of France. But France said the signals came from Russian warships.

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