Dome: New ad campaign in N.C. raps Obama on economy

FROM STAFF REPORTSOctober 10, 2012 

American Crossroads, the super PAC, has begun airing a TV commercial in North Carolina that criticizes President Barack Obama for promoting the same policies that failed to get the economy moving during the last four years. The $1.5 million ad buy will run one week.

“Obama’s weak leadership on the economy over the last four years has yielded weak results and a weaker America,’’ said Steven Law, president and CEO of American Crossroads. “If the last four years saw the worst economic recovery in modern history, why should voters expect another four years of Obama to be any different?”

Supreme Court musings

CNN Supreme Court producer Bill Mears recently posted on the station’s political website his musings about potential U.S. Supreme Court nominees if Mitt Romney is elected president. Among them: North Carolina’s Allyson Duncan, currently a judge on the 4th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.

“Appointed by George W. Bush. First African-American woman on that court. Strong resume: Duke University law school, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission attorney – where she worked with Clarence Thomas. Law professor and private attorney.” That’s Mears’ summary on Duncan.

Mears writes that his list of nine was compiled from several sources, including those close to Romney.

Duncan, a former president of the N.C. Bar Association, is one of three North Carolina judges on the 15-member federal appellate court. The others are Albert Diaz and James Wynn Jr.

Biden’s wife to visit Triangle

Jill Biden, wife of the vice president, will make a campaign swing through North Carolina on Saturday, according to the campaign. The trip will include a stop in the Triangle, with other details to be announced later.

The trip by Biden comes two days after her husband debates Congressman Paul Ryan on Thursday. Her visit also comes two days after Romney’s campaign appearance in Asheville.

Her husband, Vice President Joe Biden, campaigned in Asheville, last week.

Christie a regular guest

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is returning to the North Carolina campaign trail – again – this month on behalf of Republican gubernatorial candidate Pat McCrory.

Christie’s visit is at least his third – we’ve lost count, actually – to the state to promote McCrory and Romney. He will appear at a Johnston County Republican Party barbecue Oct. 26 in Smithfield – dubbed by organizers as the largest political rally in North Carolina.

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr and a host of other GOP candidates are expected to attend the dinner. The event is free, but donations are accepted.

Dalton robo-calls miss mark

The campaign of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Walter Dalton has begun using robo-calls questioning the ethics of his Republican opponent, McCrory. The only problem is that some of the robo-calls have gone wide of their mark and have reached GOP households, including those of House Speaker Thom Tillis.

The robo-calls are similar to radio ads that the Dalton campaign has begun running charging that McCrory has failed to report campaign flights, and his past campaign donors have been prosecuted.

Romney a victor in NASCAR circles

So, it turns out that Romney has a lot of support among NASCAR fans, not just NASCAR owners. Romney leads Obama by a 63-34 percent margin, according to a poll released by the Tarrance Group on Wednesday.

That should not be surprising. But there was a poll out a couple of weeks ago that Dome noted showing Obama with surprising support among NASCAR fans. And the Republican Party wanted to make sure everyone saw the latest poll.

The survey also found that NASCAR fans were more likely (68 percent) than all voters (54 percent) to say the country is on the wrong track.

Staff writers Rob Christensen, Craig Jarvis and John Frank

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