Top prospects eye N.C. schools

dscott@charlotteobserver.comNovember 15, 2012 

KENNEDY_MEEKS_HOOPS_04

West Charlotte All-American basketball player Kennedy Meeks pulls down a rebound during a defensive drill on Thursday, November 8, 2012 at West Charlotte High School in Charlotte, NC. Meeks will pick UNC or Georgetown and is torn over the choice. Jeff Siner - jsiner@charlotteobserver.com

JEFF SINER — jsiner@charlotteobserver.com

The beginning of college basketball’s early signing period Wednesday didn’t produce much news or drama on a national scale.

The country’s top three prospects – forward Andrew Wiggins of Huntington, W.Va., power forward Julius Randle of Plano, Texas and forward Jabari Parker of Chicago – still haven’t decided where they will play.

West Charlotte center Kennedy Meeks, ranked the country’s No. 10 prospect by Lenoir recruiting analyst Bob Gibbons, has not yet decided between North Carolina and Georgetown.

Wiggins likely won’t make his decision during the early signing period, which ends Nov. 21. Parker, who is considering Duke, reportedly will make an announcement sometime later this week.

Wiggins is considering North Carolina, Kentucky, Florida State, Syracuse and Kansas. Randle has N.C. State, Kentucky, Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma and Florida on his list. Parker has narrowed it down to Duke, Stanford, Kentucky, Michigan State, Brigham Young and Florida.

N.C. State target BeeJay Anya, a forward from Hyattsville, Md., will announce his decision later this week. Where Anya goes likely hinges on Randle’s decision.

Some players reportedly signed Wednesday, including power forward Isaiah Hicks (Oxford) with North Carolina, shooting guard Matt Jones (DeSoto, Texas) with Duke and guard-forward Sindarius Thornwell (a Lancaster, S.C., resident who plays at Oak Hill, Va., Academy) with South Carolina.

News & Observer is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service