Film Picks

The best film picks, Jan. 25

CorrespondentJanuary 24, 2013 

From left, Charlton Heston and Orson Welles in the 1958 thriller “Touch of Evil.”

COURTESY OF UNIVERSAL PICTURES

  • Other highlights • Saturday afternoon in Durham, the Center for Documentary Studies is hosting Home Movies Day, which will feature amateur home movies, and a Q&A with local film archivist Skip Eisenhower. The event runs from 1 to 5 p.m., and is free. Details: 919-660-3663; cdsporch.org. • Thursday night at the Varsity Theater in Chapel Hill, the Ackland Film Forum is screening Jon Alpert and Matthew O’Neill’s 2005 documentary “Turkey’s Tigers” in their “Cinema of the Global Middle East” series sponsored by Art/Islam, the Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations, and the Duke-UNC Consortium for Middle East Studies. It starts at 7, and it’s free. Details: 967-8665; www.varsityonfranklin.com.

In the late ’90s, one of the many wrongs that legendary film maker Orson Welles endured throughout his troubled career in Hollywood was righted when a restored version of his 1958 thriller “Touch of Evil” was released, based on a 58-page memo Welles wrote of suggested changes. The N.C. Museum of Art will be screening the acclaimed 1998 restoration Friday night as part of their Winter film series “Universal @ 100.” Charlton Heston, in a strange piece of casting as a Mexican, stars as a newlywed drug enforcement official, who finds himself caught in a caper involving murder, kidnapping, and police corruption in a fictional border town.

Welles, who wrote the screenplay loosely based on Whit Masterson’s novel “Badge of Evil,” has one of his most memorable roles as the grotesque police captain Hank Quinlan, who clashes with Heston. The cast also includes Janet Leigh as Heston’s wife, Dennis Weaver as a creepy hotel night manager, Marlene Dietrich as an ex-lover of Quinlan’s, and an uncredited cameo by Welles’ old Mercury Theatre colleague Joseph Cotten as a detective. NCMA Film Curator Laura Boyes will introduce the film. It starts at 8 at the Museum Auditorium in the East Building. Tickets are $7 ($5 for students and NCMA members). Details: 919-715-5923; ncartmuseum.org/calendar.

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