Louisville, Michigan trade shadows for limelight

Associated PressApril 7, 2013 

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ARLINGTON, TX - MARCH 31: Mitch McGary #4 of the Michigan Wolverines reacts in the first half against the Florida Gators during the South Regional Round Final of the 2013 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament at Dallas Cowboys Stadium on March 31, 2013 in Arlington, Texas. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

TOM PENNINGTON — Getty Images

  • The Matchup Monday night’s NCAA championship teams aren’t exactly mirror images of each other, but they sure aren’t opposites either. Louisville, which held up its mantle as the tournament’s overall No. 1 seed, will take on Michigan, a No. 4 seed which knocked off the likes of Kansas, Florida and Syracuse on its way to the title game. BACKCOURT

    Michigan attacks with a young team that feeds off Trey Burke, its leader. If there is a knock on the sophomore, it’s his inconsistency from game to game. In the five tournament games he has ranged from six points to 23 (and those 23 all came in the second half and overtime in the win over top-seeded Kansas.) He has not shot better than 50 percent in any game and was 1-for-8 from the field against Syracuse. Tim Hardaway Jr. and Nik Stauskas have kept up the scoring when Burke doesn’t, and a big surprise was the solid minutes from freshman Caris LeVert in the semifinal.

    Russ Smith and Peyton Siva dominate the minutes for the Cardinals in the backcourt, and they are the core of the pressure defense that wears down opponents. They do force turnovers throughout the game but it’s the relentless pressure that changes the way teams play in the final minutes. Wichita State only committed 11 turnovers but the bulk of those came in the final minutes. Smith is averaging 25.0 points in the tournament, and he has 15 steals in the five games. Siva has been struggling with his shot – 1-for-12 from 3-point range in the tournament – but he is still averaging 8.6 points and leads the team with 23 assists. Losing Kevin Ware to the broken leg against Duke has taken away a big part of the pressure defense. EDGE: Louisville

    FRONTCOURT

    Mitch McGary is working his way into Michigan lore with an incredible NCAA tournament. The freshmen forward didn’t crack the starting lineup until the tournament , and all he’s done since then is average 16.0 points and 11.6 rebounds while shooting 69.8 percent from the field. Glenn Robinson III is averaging 12.8 points and 6.2 rebounds and has taken advantage of all the attention paid to McGary for some easy points, especially on offensive rebounds.

    Louisville’s big man in the middle, Gorgui Deing, has to bounce back from a scoreless semifinal and put up numbers like the 8.8 points and 7.2 rebounds he’s averaged in the tournament. He has 12 blocks and seven steals and with his wingspan he’s a big part of the pressure defense. Chane Behanan and Wayne Blackshear have been augmented up front by freshman Montrezl Harrell, who gave the Cardinals some good minutes against Wichita State. EDGE: Michigan

    BENCH

    Michigan’s biggest contribution from its reserves in the tournament has been the outside shooting of Spike Albrecht, who has yet to miss in five 3-point attempts. LeVert came through against Syracuse.

    Louisville unloaded its bench against Wichita State and with Luke Hancock leading the way, the Cardinals’ reserves scored 34 of the team’s 72 points. Hancock, who had scored in double figures once in the tournament when he had 10 points against Duke, chipped in 20 points on 6-for-9 shooting, while Harrell had eight points on 4-for-4 shooting. The surprise of all was Tim Henderson, who had scored six points since Christmas and matched that total on two huge 3-pointers against Wichita State. EDGE: Louisville

    COACH

    John Beilein, who is in his first Final Four, is considered among the top coaches in the country and his teams reflect his sideline demeanor: calm and in control. Rick Pitino is trying to become the first coach to win a national championship at two schools, having won it all with Kentucky in 1996. His team’s style is a lot like his on the sideline, in control on the outside but going at a frenetic pace on the inside. EDGE: Louisville

    INTANGIBLES

    Michigan’s past two championship game appearances were losses, the second of which ended with Chris Webber calling a timeout the Wolverines didn’t have in a tight game against North Carolina. Louisville has inspiration sitting on the bench in Ware. Just a week after the country saw his horrific injury in the regional final, he is on crutches and with his teammates in his home state. The picture of Ware and his father hugging after the semifinal win will be shown for years to come. EDGE: Louisville.

    Associated Press

— The hoops teams at Louisville and Michigan are used to being overlooked.

The Cardinals may be a national powerhouse, but they’re still considered second fiddle in their own state. The Kentucky Wildcats are the blue bloods of the bluegrass, while Louisville settles for being viewed as more of a blue-collar school.

The Michigan basketball team knows what that’s like. Football rules on the Wolverines’ campus – rightly so, said Tim Hardaway Jr., given that program’s long, storied history.

“We still have a ways to go,” said Hardaway, Michigan’s junior guard. “Football has a lot more national championships than we do.”

Well, it’s kind of hard to overlook either team now.

Louisville and Michigan will meet Monday night in the NCAA championship game.

The Cardinals (34-5) have lived up to their billing as the tournament’s top overall seed, blowing through their first four opponents before rallying from a dozen points down in the second half to beat surprising Wichita State 72-68 in the national semifinals.

It’s been quite a run for the Louisville athletic program, in general. The women’s basketball team also reached the Final Four, while the football team won a Big East title and stunned Florida in the Sugar Bowl.

All the while, they’re battling Kentucky for the state’s affections.

“We’re not a who’s who like Harvard and Yale in the alumni world,” coach Rick Pitino said Sunday. “We’re a blue-collar school that supports each other. One of the coolest places I’ve ever worked.”

Pitino should know. He also worked at Kentucky, leading the Wildcats to a national title in 1996.

Now, he’s got a chance to become the first coach to win basketball championships at two schools.

“I haven’t thought about it for one second,” insisted Pitino, already the first coach to guide three schools to the Final Four. “We have built a brand on Louisville first. Everything we do is about the team, about the family. I’d be a total hypocrite if I said (winning another title is) really important. It really is not important. I want to win because I’m part of this team. That’s it.”

Football may come first at Michigan (31-7), but the Wolverines haven’t exactly been pushovers on the hardwood.

They won a national title in 1989, beating Seton Hall in overtime, and they’ve lost three other times in the championship. The school is best known for the Fab Five, that group of stellar recruits who led Michigan to back-to-back final appearances in 1992 and ’93.

This team is cut from the same mold, with three freshmen starters and two other first-year players who made big contributions in a semifinal victory over Syracuse.

“The Fab Five was a great team. I mean, a really great team,” said freshman guard Caris LeVert, who came off the bench to score eight points against the Orange. “They did some great things for our school.”

But these guys can do something the Fab Five never did – win it all.

“Just making it to the Final Four, we are going to hang up a banner in the Crisler Center,” said another freshman, Glenn Robinson III. “But we aren’t done. Having the chance to hang another one up for a national championship … is all kind of surreal to us.”

Both teams got to this point with crucial assists from the backups.

LeVert and Spike Albrecht – yep, another freshman – both hit a pair of 3-pointers in Michigan’s semifinal win, points that were desperately needed with player of the year Trey Burke struggling through a brutal night. The sophomore guard made only 1 of 8 shots and finished with seven points, just the second time this season he’s been held in single digits.

Burke said he’ll gladly hand off the scoring duties to someone else again Monday if the Cardinals take an approach similar to Syracuse’s.

“Pretty much every time I got the ball, I had two people in my face,” he said. “I tried not to force anything, but I probably forced two or three shots. That 3 I hit (from way out and his only basket of the game) wasn’t a good shot. But I try not to force things and just look for different ways to find the open man.”

Louisville, inspired by the gruesome injury to Kevin Ware but needing others to step up while he’s down, got an even bigger contribution off the bench than Michigan.

Luke Hancock scored 20 points. Walk-on Tim Henderson, moving up in the rotation because of Ware’s broken leg, knocked down back-to-back 3-pointers that turned the momentum when it looked as though Wichita State might pull off another shocker.

There’s always a chance for the more obscure players to step up on the biggest stages.

“Those guys, not that you don’t pay attention to them, but your strategy is not toward them.” Pitino said. “We’re all trying to stop the great players defensively, choreograph our defensive plan to stop the great players.”

But there’s no doubt Michigan needs Burke to have a much better game, especially against Louisville’s fearsome press, just as the Cardinals will be counting on Russ Smith to lead the way. He scored 21 points in the semifinals despite a woeful night at the foul line.

Smith is on the verge of completing quite a journey, considering it looked for a while like he might not even finish his career with the Cardinals. Unhappy with his playing time and constantly sparring with Pitino, the now-junior guard considered transferring after his freshman season.

Boy, he’s sure glad he stayed.

“I was leaving, but I talked to my dad and decided to come back,” Smith remembered. “I decided to work hard and try to earn some minutes.”

He still gets into it with Pitino from time to time – remember, the coach dubbed him “Russdiculous” for some of the shots he puts up – but it’s hard to envision where this team might be without him.

“I just try to make winning plays,” Smith said. “I don’t look at myself as a point guard or a shooting guard. I look at myself as a winning player.”

Pitino has tried to stress to his players the importance of winning one more game. They may hang a banner for making it to the Final Four at Louisville, too, but the best way to ensure you don’t get overlooked is to win it all.

To drive that point home, he showed his team the recent documentary on North Carolina State’s improbable title in 1983, the one that left coach Jim Valvano running around the court looking desperately for someone to hug, the one that his players still get together to reminisce about – on and off camera.

“We were the No. 1 seeds. We weren’t Cinderellas like N.C. State,” Pitino said. “But I wanted them to understand that because (the Wolfpack) won a championship, for the rest of their lives they will sit around that table. Every year, they will get together – for the rest of their lives.”

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