Triangle high schools make lists of nation’s best

khui@newsobserver.comApril 23, 2013 

Several Triangle schools appear on newly released, competing lists of the nation’s best public high schools.

Durham School of the Arts was the top school in the state and the Triangle, ranked 176 nationally, in the U.S. News & World Report’s 2013 Best High Schools list released Tuesday. Like Durham School of the Arts, Carrboro High School received a gold medal and was ranked No. 189 nationally.

Other Triangle schools in the newsmagazine’s top 1,000 include Northwood High School in Pittsboro at No. 899 with a silver medal and Middle Creek High School in Cary at No. 900 with a silver medal.

The U.S. News rankings were significantly different from the Washington Post’s America’s Most Challenging High Schools list released last week.

Raleigh Charter High School was the top Triangle school, at No. 81, in The Washington Post list.

Other Triangle schools in the top 1,000 include East Chapel Hill High School at No. 100, Woods Charter School in Chatham County at No. 191, Carrboro High School at No. 288, Enloe High School in Raleigh at No. 340, Durham School of the Arts at No. 523, Green Hope High School in Cary at No. 554, Broughton High School in Raleigh at No. 590 and Jordan High School in Durham at No. 750.

Rankings may change daily as schools complain to U.S. News and the Washington Post about inaccurate data.

The U.S. News list tends to be different because it takes into account the performance of all students, not just those taking advanced exams.

The newsmagazine used state reading and math tests to see whether a school was doing better than expected overall and whether its black, Hispanic and low-income students were exceeding state averages. Schools that cleared the first two hurdles were then judged on their students’ college readiness, based on test data for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate exams.

Go to www.usnews.com/education/best-high-schools to view the complete list.

The Washington Post ranks schools through a formula that takes the number of Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and Advanced International Certificate of Education tests given at a school each year, divided by the number of seniors who graduated that year.

Go to apps.washingtonpost.com/highschoolchallenge/ to view the whole list.

Hui: 919-829-4534

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