C-SPAN spends a week capturing Raleigh’s history and culture

bcain@newsobserver.comMay 13, 2013 

CSPANWEEK-NE-051213-TEL

 

TRAVIS LONG — tlong@newsobserver.com Buy Photo

  • Raleigh stories coming to C-SPAN

    • N.C. Department of Archives, home of original city planning maps

    • Anne Cooper, prominent African American scholar

    • David Marshall "Carbine" Williams, inventor of the carbine rifle

    • N.C. State Library’s Rare Collections

    • Authors Rob Christensen (“The Paradox of Tar Heel Politics”), Ansley Herring Wegner (“Phantom Pain: North Carolina’s Artificial Limb Program for Confederate Veterans”), Katherine Charron (“Septima Clark: Freedom’s Teacher”), Carolyn Murray Happer and Morris Glass (“Chosen for Destruction: The Story of a Holocaust Survivor”)

    • Interviews with Raleigh Mayor Nancy McFarlane and Gov. Pat McCrory

  • Tuesday coverage

    C-SPAN cameras will be at Quail Ridge Books, 3522 Wade Ave in Raleigh, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. 919-828-1588

— If you spot a red, white and blue C-SPAN truck parked around Raleigh this week, that means you’re in the vicinity of some significant bit of city history or culture.

The nonprofit cable TV network, known for its coverage of Congress and other public affairs programs, is spending the week in Raleigh interviewing historians, authors and VIPs for a “Raleigh Weekend” of programming to air in June.

C-SPAN’s colorful Local Content Vehicle (LCV) fleet – there are three of them in town – will visit the state capital, local libraries and museums, Shaw University, N.C. State University, Research Triangle Park and other sites.

The network’s 12-city 2013 tour also features Columbia, S.C.; Palm Springs, Calif.; Alexandria, Va.; and Dover, Del.

At a Monday news conference kicking off the network’s Raleigh coverage, Nancy Olsen, owner of Quail Ridge Books, noted that the capital city is “rich and infused with history and culture.”

“We have hundreds of authors of fiction and non-fiction,” she said. “who help us understand and hopefully help us learn from our past. We know Raleigh is booming economically and technologically, but just as important, or maybe more so, is our cultural growth and enlightenment, which encourages us to strive for humanity and which helps make a civilization great.”

At the same news conference, Mayor Nancy McFarlane proclaimed May 13-17 to be C-SPAN Week in Raleigh.

C-SPAN has three networks that can be viewed via cable or satellite subscriptions. The Raleigh content will air on C-SPAN 2, the network’s nonfiction book channel, and C-SPAN 3, a channel devoted to American history, on June 15 and 16. The video segments will also be available online at the C-SPAN website ( www.c-span.org/LocalContent).

If you’d like a peek at C-SPAN magic in action, cameras will be at Quail Ridge Books on Wade Avenue on Tuesday night for a 7:30 book reading by Carole Peppe Hewitt, author of “Financing Our Foodshed: Growing Local with Slow Money” and one of the founders of the nonprofit group Slow Money NC.

Raleigh stories coming to C-SPAN

• N.C. Department of Archives, home of original city planning maps

• Anne Cooper, prominent African American scholar

• David Marshall "Carbine" Williams, inventor of the carbine rifle

• N.C. State Library’s Rare Collections

• Authors Rob Christensen (“The Paradox of Tar Heel Politics”), Ansley Herring Wegner (“Phantom Pain: North Carolina’s Artificial Limb Program for Confederate Veterans”), Katherine Charron (“Septima Clark: Freedom’s Teacher”), Carolyn Murray Happer and Morris Glass (“Chosen for Destruction: The Story of a Holocaust Survivor”)

• Interviews with Raleigh Mayor Nancy McFarlane and Gov. Pat McCrory

Tuesday coverage

C-SPAN cameras will be at Quail Ridge Books, 3522 Wade Ave in Raleigh, at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. 919-828-1588

City tour segments

To watch online segments from C-SPAN city tours, go to www.c-span.org/LocalContent

Cain: 919-829-4579

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