Parenting

Why ‘nice’ moms yell at their kids

McClatchy-TribuneJuly 22, 2013 

“I’m a yeller,” she said, she being the mother of three young children.

“No,” I replied, “you’re not. There is no genetic predisposition toward yelling, and no biochemical or neurological condition that makes yelling inevitable, much less irresistible.”

“But I yell at my kids all the time, it seems.”

“I’m not arguing with that.”

“Well, why then do I yell?”

“My best answer, based on experience, is that you yell for the same reason many of today’s mothers yell: You’re trying not to be mean.”

She stared at me for a few seconds, then said, “You’re pulling my leg, right?”

No, I wasn’t pulling her leg. As in this case, too many of today’s moms think they’re “yellers.” They think yelling is the inescapable consequence of having children.

Yelling is not good for the parent and it certainly isn’t good for the child. It doesn’t traumatize a child, mind you, but it certainly fails to convey confidence in one’s authority. And children need a constant, calm, confident authority like they need a constant unconditional love. You see, all the love in the world cannot make up for a lack of leadership in a child’s life. Authority, properly conveyed, is a form of nurturing.

Over the past several generations, yelling has become epidemic because today’s moms are trying to be nice. Example: When a modern mom wants her child to perform a chore, she bends forward at the waist, grabs her knees, and employs a pleading tone like she’s petitioning the King of Swat for a favor. She finishes this wheedle by asking the child if her request meets with his approval, as in “Okay?”

With the best of intentions (she wants to be nice), Milquetoast Mom gives her child permission to develop attention deficit and oppositional-defiant disorders. As these disorders develop, she finds herself having to exert more and more energy to get her kids to do something simple, like look at her when she speaks. She begins raising her voice, then she screams, then she feels guilty, then she goes back to grabbing her knees and wheedling.

“But I don’t want my kids to think I’m mean!” said Yelling Milquetoast Mom.

“Yes, you do,” I said. “From a child’s point of view, a parent is mean when the child accepts that the parent means what he or she says, the first time he or she says it. When you have convinced your child of that, which requires that you stop trying to be so nice, you will stop yelling, and you and your child will have a far more creative relationship.”

I don’t think parenting was ever so ironic as it is today.

rosemond.com

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