What to Watch on Tuesday: PBS begins Gates series on African Americans

Posted by Brooke Cain on October 22, 2013 

Civil rights icon Ruby Bridges, journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. discuss the chronicle of the African-American experience.

PBS — PBS

The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross (8pm, UNC-TV) - In this first part of a six-hour series, Henry Louis Gates Jr. chronicles the history of African-Americans, beginning with the years 1500 to 1800. Included tonight, the first documented introduction of slaves to North America, which occurred in 1619 at Jamestown, Va.; and the expansion of slavery during the 18th century, which is told via the story of a 10-year-old girl named Priscilla who was brought to South Carolina from Sierra Leone.

Also on . . .

 

New Girl (9pm, Fox) - Jess throws a Halloween party and teams up with Nick and Winston to cheer up Schmidt by pretending to be his childhood hero, Michael Keaton (I can just hear Schmidt pronouncing Kee-TON right now). However, Schmidt ends up making a decision that could affect them all.

Trophy Wife (9:30pm, ABC) - Pete and Kate spice things up inside a janitor's closet, while Jackie works on her online dating profile.

Frontline: Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria (10pm, UNC-TV) - An investigation into the rise of untreatable infections that have come about due to decades of antibiotic overuse. The report tells the story of a young girl placed on life support in an Arizona hospital and an outbreak at a prestigious hospital that resulted in six deaths.

Cold Justice (10pm, TNT) - The 2008 murder of a feed-plant worker is investigated in the Season 1 finale.

Chicago Fire (10pm, NBC) - Boden's future with the firehouse is in jeopardy when McLeod pushes him toward an early retirement and finds a potential replacement for him.

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