A puppy for Pat?

Posted by David Ranii on November 18, 2013 

Gov. Pat McCrory and first lady Ann McCrory are wrestling with whether the Executive Mansion would be an appropriate home for a new dog.

The McCrorys discussed the issue in an impromptu interview Saturday at a dog adoption event they hosted at the mansion to highlight a bill pending in the legislature that would set minimum standards for large dog-breeding facilities.

Their concern is whether all the hustle-and-bustle at the mansion is canine-friendly.

“We’ve got trusties, we’ve got troopers, we’ve got us, we’ve got staff,” Ann McCrory said.

“They always call it the Executive Mansion, (but) it’s really an office … a 35,000-square-foot office building,” the governor added. “People forget that.

“We want to make sure it’s a setting that’s right ... This isn’t a normal home.”

The mansion already proved too much for their dog Moe, whom the McCrorys keep at their home in Charlotte. Moe suffers from heart and gastrointestinal diseases – cardiomyopathy and irritable bowel syndrome, Ann McCrory said.

“When Moe was up here, I thought he was going to go nuts,” she said. “He wouldn't stop running up and down the stairs.”

One of the ideas the couple is exploring is having a trusty train a new dog and be the “point person” who trains everyone else at the mansion about interacting with it.

Consistency is key, said Ann McCrory.

“It’s no different from raising children,” she said, “making sure they eat properly and don’t go into the kitchen like my husband and take chocolate chip cookies by the handful.”

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