This week at the American Dance Festival

CorrespondentJuly 5, 2014 

A look at what’s coming this week at the American Dance Festival in Durham:

John Jasperse Company

Why go: Jasperse, an experimental choreographer for 30 years, explores the human condition through humor, surprise and illusion, supplemented by striking sets, props and music.

What’s on: “Within between,” a piece for four dancers, combining a variety of dance movements, from ballet to hoedown, along with verbal and vocal accompaniment – and a very long pole. Performances of the work earlier this year drew critical praise for the exhilarating dancing and constant challenging of expectations.

When: 8 p.m. Monday through Wednesday

Where: Reynolds Industries Theater, Bryan University Center, Duke University, 125 Science Drive.

Tickets: $27

Info: 919-684-4444 or tickets.duke.edu

Ballet Preljocaj

Why go: Winner of this year’s ADF lifetime achievement award, Angelin Preljocaj has being choreographing for three decades, making visually dramatic, intensely energetic pieces that usually divide critics but never fail to intrigue and involve.

What’s on: “Empty moves (parts I, II and III),” composed of actions and movements that accompany composer John Cage’s recorded reading of a text based on Thoreau. The dancing flows continuously with a Zen-like commitment.

When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday

Where: Durham Performing Arts Center, 123 Vivian St., Durham

Tickets: $19.25-$55.75

Info: 919-680-2787 or dpacnc.com

More info: 919-684-6402 or americandancefestival.org

Dicks: music_theater@lycos.com

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