Gov. McCrory says he will sign NC Common Core bill

Posted by Craig Jarvis on July 16, 2014 

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Rolesville Middle School student Asia Hicks concentrates as she works on an assignment in Mary Nelson's Common Core Math 7 Plus class at the school on Feb. 21, 2014.

CHRIS SEWARD — cseward@newsobserver.com Buy Photo

A compromise bill reviewing the state’s Common Core education curriculum passed the House on Wednesday and is on its way to the governor, who says he will sign it into law.

The House passed the legislation 71-34. The Senate approved it last week.

"I will sign this bill because it does not change any of North Carolina’s education standards," Gov. Pat McCrory said in a statement his office released. "It does initiate a much-needed, comprehensive and thorough review of standards. No standards will change without the approval of the State Board of Education. I especially look forward to the recommendations that will address testing issues so we can measure what matters most for our teachers, parents and students."

The legislation creates a commission to rework the state’s math and language arts requirements. House and Senate members kept reworking the proposal, but finally ended up with a version close to what the Senate wanted.

Rep. Craig Horn, a Republican from Weddington, said the bill "melds the two versions quite well." He said the state would be able to craft a curriculum best tailored to North Carolina.

Rep. Tricia Cotham, a Democrat from Matthews, said she has been involved in the Common Core debate for years, and that it has taken a political turn by focusing on federal government and President Obama.

"Why are we really doing this and what is the real reason?" Cotham said. "Is this really to better education or is this more political in nature? I worry this is more political."

Rep. Michael Speciale, a Republican from New Bern, said educators have complained about Common Core privately while publicly claiming to support it, echoing the state Department of Instruction "propaganda."

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