Notebook

Dove season will open Labor Day

CorrespondentJuly 16, 2014 

Dove hunters who want more opportunities will get their wish this fall.

Hunters will have 20 additional dove hunting days in seasons announced Saturday by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. However, hunters will have to start the first dove season segment on a Monday, Labor Day on Sept. 1, instead of the preceding Saturday because federal rules do not allow states to open migratory game bird seasons before Sept. 1. The first Saturday of the month will be Sept. 6.

To allocate the 20 extra days, North Carolina added to the Sept. 1-Oct. 11 segment and to the late November and early December segment, which will run until the season ends Jan. 15. The second season segment will begin Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 27, not the usual preceding Monday.

Seasons and limits for most other species are similar to last year’s webless migratory game bird and waterfowl early seasons and September seasons for Canada geese and teal.

The statewide early season for Canada geese is Sept. 1-30. More seasons, including extended falconry seasons, can be found at www.ncwildlife.org/hunting.

Calls to action: Conservation organizations, including the Quality Deer Management Association and the N.C. Bowhunters Association, this week continued efforts to urge legislators to remove language in a state budget bill that would move the control of the state’s 37 deer-farming operations from the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission to the N.C. Department of Agriculture.

“I think it’s making an impact, and we can hope they will modify it or even remove it,” Guy Gardner, QDMA Cape Fear River Branch spokesman, said by phone Tuesday night.

The item in Senate Bill 744 would increase the likelihood of chronic wasting disease entering the state and devastating the free-ranging deer targeted by the state’s approximately 300,000 hunters, the organizations say.

Though opposed to “canned hunts” of captive deer, Gardner said the item might not have been such an issue except for the possibility of CWD being brought into the state.

“It’s just a matter of time,” Gardner said. “There have been escapees from these deer farms through the country.”

Follow the budget or find legislators at www.ncleg.net. Learn more from the N.C. Camouflage Coalition’s Action Alert at www.nccamo.org.

Women’s weekend: Brenda Valentine, known as “The First Lady of Hunting,” will be among the speakers for the N.C. Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation’s inaugural Women in the Outdoors statewide event, Women. Only. Weekend., on Aug. 15-16 at Bass Pro Shops in Concord. The cost is $65-$100. Contact Wynn Smith at wynnsmith101@gmail.com. Register at www.ncnwtf.com.

Women’s workshop: The Wake County Wildlife Club will host an Aug. 23 shooting sports and archery workshop, part of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission’s Becoming an Outdoors-Woman program. Registration is free. Contact BB Gillen at 919-218-3638 or bb.gillen@ncwildlife.org. Learn at www.ncwildlife.org/learning.

Comment due: July 21 is the deadline for comment on NOAA Fisheries’ Amendment 8 to the fishery management plan for coral, coral reefs, and live/hardbottom habitats of the South Atlantic. The amendment would expand boundaries protecting the Cape Lookout Coral Habitat Area of Particular Concern. Learn more at www.safmc.net.

Send news and announcements to outdoors@newsobserver.com.

Boggess: boggess.teri@gmail.com Twitter: @BoggessT

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