Molly Mahannah wearing a sweatshirt and a blanket at her desk at B2 Interactive, a web design and digital marketing agency, in Omaha, Neb., July 31, 2015. Most office buildings set temperature based on a formula from the ’60s based on the metabolic rates of men. This formula is now being challenged to reduce energy consumption and combat global warming.
Molly Mahannah wearing a sweatshirt and a blanket at her desk at B2 Interactive, a web design and digital marketing agency, in Omaha, Neb., July 31, 2015. Most office buildings set temperature based on a formula from the ’60s based on the metabolic rates of men. This formula is now being challenged to reduce energy consumption and combat global warming. CHRIS MACHIAN NYT
Molly Mahannah wearing a sweatshirt and a blanket at her desk at B2 Interactive, a web design and digital marketing agency, in Omaha, Neb., July 31, 2015. Most office buildings set temperature based on a formula from the ’60s based on the metabolic rates of men. This formula is now being challenged to reduce energy consumption and combat global warming. CHRIS MACHIAN NYT

Chilly at work? A decades-old formula may be to blame

August 08, 2015 1:30 PM