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  • Wild red wolves in their eastern NC habitat

    Camera trap video footage shows wild red wolves in eastern North Carolina. Red wolves were reintroduced to NC in 1987 after being removed from the wild for safekeeping in the 1970's. The US Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced a plan to pull the remaining wild red wolves back to only federal lands in Dare County, a reduction from the current 5-county recovery area.

Camera trap video footage shows wild red wolves in eastern North Carolina. Red wolves were reintroduced to NC in 1987 after being removed from the wild for safekeeping in the 1970's. The US Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced a plan to pull the remaining wild red wolves back to only federal lands in Dare County, a reduction from the current 5-county recovery area. Wildlands Network
Camera trap video footage shows wild red wolves in eastern North Carolina. Red wolves were reintroduced to NC in 1987 after being removed from the wild for safekeeping in the 1970's. The US Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced a plan to pull the remaining wild red wolves back to only federal lands in Dare County, a reduction from the current 5-county recovery area. Wildlands Network

Red wolf territory in NC would be scaled back – and many people aren’t happy about it

July 26, 2017 10:07 AM

UPDATED July 26, 2017 03:02 PM

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  • Chainsaws turn storm debris into wildlife art

    A pair of chainsaw artists carved this sculpture of local wildlife from a fallen oak on the Graylyn multi-use trail in Umstead State Park. Getting there requires a hike.