George Takei doesn’t shy away from digging into his remarkable career and personal life in Jennifer Kroot’s incisive film “To Be Takei.” As a child forced into Japanese-American internment camps, the actor-turned-activist reveals the ways that racism affected him well into his early acting career, where he played stereotypical Asian stock characters in film and television shows. Even after landing the iconic role of Hikaru Sulu on “Star Trek,” Takei’s sharp eye, coupled with his wicked sense of humor, continued to challenge the status quo well into the 21st century.
George Takei doesn’t shy away from digging into his remarkable career and personal life in Jennifer Kroot’s incisive film “To Be Takei.” As a child forced into Japanese-American internment camps, the actor-turned-activist reveals the ways that racism affected him well into his early acting career, where he played stereotypical Asian stock characters in film and television shows. Even after landing the iconic role of Hikaru Sulu on “Star Trek,” Takei’s sharp eye, coupled with his wicked sense of humor, continued to challenge the status quo well into the 21st century.
George Takei doesn’t shy away from digging into his remarkable career and personal life in Jennifer Kroot’s incisive film “To Be Takei.” As a child forced into Japanese-American internment camps, the actor-turned-activist reveals the ways that racism affected him well into his early acting career, where he played stereotypical Asian stock characters in film and television shows. Even after landing the iconic role of Hikaru Sulu on “Star Trek,” Takei’s sharp eye, coupled with his wicked sense of humor, continued to challenge the status quo well into the 21st century.

Chapel Hill: Community

August 12, 2014 12:00 AM

Arts Listings, Aug. 13

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