Pretend patient Michele Kuszajewski waits as Trina, which stands for Tele-Robotic Intelligent Nursing Assistant, moves to take her vital signs via a remote control stethoscope on Friday, Nov, 11, 2016. Trina is a first-generation nursing robot that Duke University nursing and engineering students are collaborating on to build and refine. Since the Ebola outbreak in 2014, new technologies, including robots, are being tested as alternatives to human contact to diminish risks for providers as they care for patients with infectious diseases.
Pretend patient Michele Kuszajewski waits as Trina, which stands for Tele-Robotic Intelligent Nursing Assistant, moves to take her vital signs via a remote control stethoscope on Friday, Nov, 11, 2016. Trina is a first-generation nursing robot that Duke University nursing and engineering students are collaborating on to build and refine. Since the Ebola outbreak in 2014, new technologies, including robots, are being tested as alternatives to human contact to diminish risks for providers as they care for patients with infectious diseases. Virginia Bridges vbridges@newsobserver.com
Pretend patient Michele Kuszajewski waits as Trina, which stands for Tele-Robotic Intelligent Nursing Assistant, moves to take her vital signs via a remote control stethoscope on Friday, Nov, 11, 2016. Trina is a first-generation nursing robot that Duke University nursing and engineering students are collaborating on to build and refine. Since the Ebola outbreak in 2014, new technologies, including robots, are being tested as alternatives to human contact to diminish risks for providers as they care for patients with infectious diseases. Virginia Bridges vbridges@newsobserver.com

Durham News

Duke officials test, refine robot-nurse

November 16, 2016 6:23 AM

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