A volunteer holds a heart-shaped tuber during a "Potato Drop" at Smith Warehouse on Buchanan Boulevard on Saturday, August 29, 2015. Duke University community members and other volunteers sorted 40,000 pounds of potatoes gleaned from area farms into 10-pound bags for charities such as Durham Rescue Mission, Urban Ministries of Durham and the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina. Six Duke departments, including the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership and Religious Life at Duke, organized the event with the Society of St. Andrew, a national organization that feeds the hungry. “Potatoes have a long shelf life, so we get a lot of reject potatoes,” says Meg Spears-Newsome, 24, of the Society of St. Andrew. “They can be misshapen, too big, too small. Grocery stores typically won’t sell any (with) blemishes, but they’re perfectly edible.”
A volunteer holds a heart-shaped tuber during a "Potato Drop" at Smith Warehouse on Buchanan Boulevard on Saturday, August 29, 2015. Duke University community members and other volunteers sorted 40,000 pounds of potatoes gleaned from area farms into 10-pound bags for charities such as Durham Rescue Mission, Urban Ministries of Durham and the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina. Six Duke departments, including the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership and Religious Life at Duke, organized the event with the Society of St. Andrew, a national organization that feeds the hungry. “Potatoes have a long shelf life, so we get a lot of reject potatoes,” says Meg Spears-Newsome, 24, of the Society of St. Andrew. “They can be misshapen, too big, too small. Grocery stores typically won’t sell any (with) blemishes, but they’re perfectly edible.” Mark Schultz mschultz@newsobserver.com
A volunteer holds a heart-shaped tuber during a "Potato Drop" at Smith Warehouse on Buchanan Boulevard on Saturday, August 29, 2015. Duke University community members and other volunteers sorted 40,000 pounds of potatoes gleaned from area farms into 10-pound bags for charities such as Durham Rescue Mission, Urban Ministries of Durham and the Food Bank of Central & Eastern North Carolina. Six Duke departments, including the Duke-Durham Neighborhood Partnership and Religious Life at Duke, organized the event with the Society of St. Andrew, a national organization that feeds the hungry. “Potatoes have a long shelf life, so we get a lot of reject potatoes,” says Meg Spears-Newsome, 24, of the Society of St. Andrew. “They can be misshapen, too big, too small. Grocery stores typically won’t sell any (with) blemishes, but they’re perfectly edible.” Mark Schultz mschultz@newsobserver.com

Duke hashes it out for the hungry

August 30, 2015 10:20 AM

UPDATED August 30, 2015 03:23 PM

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