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  • Coco the poodle is reunited with her North Carolina family

    Coco, a 16-year-old blind and deaf poodle, was reunited with her Concord, N.C. family Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 in Clayton, N.C. after she went missing from the family’s home in July. Coco was located in Massachusetts. Clayton Animal Control Officer Angie Lee assisted in reuniting the dog with it’s family.

Coco, a 16-year-old blind and deaf poodle, was reunited with her Concord, N.C. family Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 in Clayton, N.C. after she went missing from the family’s home in July. Coco was located in Massachusetts. Clayton Animal Control Officer Angie Lee assisted in reuniting the dog with it’s family.
Coco, a 16-year-old blind and deaf poodle, was reunited with her Concord, N.C. family Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015 in Clayton, N.C. after she went missing from the family’s home in July. Coco was located in Massachusetts. Clayton Animal Control Officer Angie Lee assisted in reuniting the dog with it’s family.

After 1,500-mile odyssey, Coco the blind poodle returned to NC owner

August 25, 2015 1:13 PM

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