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  • Miss Kagawa: The Story of a Friendship Doll from Japan

    Roy Campbell, the director of exhibits and digital media at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences, talking about Miss Kagawa, one of 58 Japanese Friendship Dolls given to the children of the United States by the children of Japan in 1927 and 1928. Miss Kagawa is said to have been the only one of the dolls to remain on display after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, though with a special message about the "ruthless leaders" of Japan and the "latent goodwill" of the Japanese people. He's talking about her continued significance today.

Roy Campbell, the director of exhibits and digital media at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences, talking about Miss Kagawa, one of 58 Japanese Friendship Dolls given to the children of the United States by the children of Japan in 1927 and 1928. Miss Kagawa is said to have been the only one of the dolls to remain on display after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, though with a special message about the "ruthless leaders" of Japan and the "latent goodwill" of the Japanese people. He's talking about her continued significance today. Video by Richard Stradling, Photo by Chuck Liddy rstradling@newsobserver.com
Roy Campbell, the director of exhibits and digital media at the N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences, talking about Miss Kagawa, one of 58 Japanese Friendship Dolls given to the children of the United States by the children of Japan in 1927 and 1928. Miss Kagawa is said to have been the only one of the dolls to remain on display after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, though with a special message about the "ruthless leaders" of Japan and the "latent goodwill" of the Japanese people. He's talking about her continued significance today. Video by Richard Stradling, Photo by Chuck Liddy rstradling@newsobserver.com

At NC museum, a Japanese doll’s message of goodwill survived Pearl Harbor

December 06, 2016 5:01 PM