Wake County paramedic Benjamin Currie steps out of an ambulance after helping a young man into the truck while on a substance abuse call Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Cary. Currie was called to the scene to assist with a behavioral health problem. Currie calmed the man down and was able to assist him into the ambulance. The patient was diverted to the UNC Health Care Crisis and Assessment Service at WakeBrook rather than being transported to an emergency room.
Wake County paramedic Benjamin Currie steps out of an ambulance after helping a young man into the truck while on a substance abuse call Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Cary. Currie was called to the scene to assist with a behavioral health problem. Currie calmed the man down and was able to assist him into the ambulance. The patient was diverted to the UNC Health Care Crisis and Assessment Service at WakeBrook rather than being transported to an emergency room. Jill Knight jhknight@newsobserver.com
Wake County paramedic Benjamin Currie steps out of an ambulance after helping a young man into the truck while on a substance abuse call Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in Cary. Currie was called to the scene to assist with a behavioral health problem. Currie calmed the man down and was able to assist him into the ambulance. The patient was diverted to the UNC Health Care Crisis and Assessment Service at WakeBrook rather than being transported to an emergency room. Jill Knight jhknight@newsobserver.com

Wake County EMS has one solution to overcrowded emergency rooms

March 14, 2015 4:00 PM

More Videos

  • Finding money for affordable housing in Wake County

    Wake County Commissioner Jessica Holmes said it will be a priority to find the money to pay for the newly adopted 20-year affordable housing plan.