Scientists at N.C. State University are closely watching a tropical plant this week as it prepares to bloom, sending out not just a big flower - one of the largest in the plant kingdom - but a big stink, as well. The rare titan arum (Amorphophallus titanum) is also known as the corpse flower because it can smell like rotting flesh. The plant - now standing about six feet tall - is expected to continue to grow throughout the week until it unfolds a magnificent flower around three feet wide. It is in a greenhouse on the N.C. State campus in Raleigh, NC on Sept. 20. It is expected to open Friday.
Scientists at N.C. State University are closely watching a tropical plant this week as it prepares to bloom, sending out not just a big flower - one of the largest in the plant kingdom - but a big stink, as well. The rare titan arum (Amorphophallus titanum) is also known as the corpse flower because it can smell like rotting flesh. The plant - now standing about six feet tall - is expected to continue to grow throughout the week until it unfolds a magnificent flower around three feet wide. It is in a greenhouse on the N.C. State campus in Raleigh, NC on Sept. 20. It is expected to open Friday. Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com
Scientists at N.C. State University are closely watching a tropical plant this week as it prepares to bloom, sending out not just a big flower - one of the largest in the plant kingdom - but a big stink, as well. The rare titan arum (Amorphophallus titanum) is also known as the corpse flower because it can smell like rotting flesh. The plant - now standing about six feet tall - is expected to continue to grow throughout the week until it unfolds a magnificent flower around three feet wide. It is in a greenhouse on the N.C. State campus in Raleigh, NC on Sept. 20. It is expected to open Friday. Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com

Big, stinky corpse flower set to bloom at NCSU

September 21, 2016 08:00 PM

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