Wake Ed

January 21, 2014

Wake County school board adopts interlocal agreement on school construction

The Wake County school board unanimously approved Tuesday night a revised interlocal agreement on school construction with the county commissioners. The pact spells out how the two boards can collaborate on property acquisition and school design.

The Wake County school board unanimously approved Tuesday night a revised interlocal agreement on school construction with the county commissioners.

The agreement still leaves in wording requested by commissioners about how the school board can lay out when it wants to turn over individual construction projects to the county. But it includes a lot of new wording from the school system, including laying out details on how both boards and their staffs can work together on property acquisition and school design.

School board members said the revisions reflect their desire to collaborate with the commissioners on construction issues. Both boards will meet in February to discuss the interlocal agreement.

Also Tuesday, the board heard how some teachers want to restore the weekly districtwide PLT time made possible by the Wake Wednesdays/Wacky Wednesdays used during the 2009-10 school year. That’s, as you recall, when classes were dismissed an hour early every Wednesday so that teachers could meet in professional learning teams.

The board approved on first reading revisions to the Code of Student Conduct to reduce how often students are suspended from school for Level I offenses.

The board postponed a presentation on staff’s recommendation for which schools should receive enrollment caps for the 2014-15 school year. The delay will give staff more time to gather additional information.

During public comment, three Lacy Elementary parents said the district shouldn’t require all third-grade students to go through the reading portfolio process in which they’d get 36 mini-assessments over the rest of the school year.

The assessments are part of the Read to Achieve program. During board comments, board vice chairman Tom Benton said that he wanted “to set the record straight” to make sure that the concerns they had about Read to Achieve were not about the need to promote literacy but whether that program will achieve that goal.

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The WakeEd blog is devoted to discussing and answering questions about the major issues facing the Wake County school system. WakeEd is maintained by The News & Observer's Wake schools reporter, T. Keung Hui.

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