A newly constructed home is being built on the formerly empty lot next to an older home on East Lee Street on the edge of downtown Raleigh Wednesday. Neighborhoods east of downtown Raleigh are being developed. New homes are attracting young professionals, and the rising costs are pushing out longtime residents including poor minority families.
A newly constructed home is being built on the formerly empty lot next to an older home on East Lee Street on the edge of downtown Raleigh Wednesday. Neighborhoods east of downtown Raleigh are being developed. New homes are attracting young professionals, and the rising costs are pushing out longtime residents including poor minority families. TRAVIS LONG tlong@newsobserver.com
A newly constructed home is being built on the formerly empty lot next to an older home on East Lee Street on the edge of downtown Raleigh Wednesday. Neighborhoods east of downtown Raleigh are being developed. New homes are attracting young professionals, and the rising costs are pushing out longtime residents including poor minority families. TRAVIS LONG tlong@newsobserver.com

Column: Downtown Raleigh neighborhoods are seeing big changes, racially and economically

August 20, 2015 05:14 PM

UPDATED August 21, 2015 04:10 PM

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