Students Kaitlyn Allen, 9, left, and Kendall Jackson, 10, study their own fingerprint on a tablet during a lesson at the Summer Institute at Compassionate Tabernacle of Faith in Raleigh on Monday, July 20, 2015. The church works with students at nearby Walnut Creek Elementary School, an almost all-minority and high poverty school that resulted from Wake County dialing back on the use of busing for diversity.
Students Kaitlyn Allen, 9, left, and Kendall Jackson, 10, study their own fingerprint on a tablet during a lesson at the Summer Institute at Compassionate Tabernacle of Faith in Raleigh on Monday, July 20, 2015. The church works with students at nearby Walnut Creek Elementary School, an almost all-minority and high poverty school that resulted from Wake County dialing back on the use of busing for diversity. Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com
Students Kaitlyn Allen, 9, left, and Kendall Jackson, 10, study their own fingerprint on a tablet during a lesson at the Summer Institute at Compassionate Tabernacle of Faith in Raleigh on Monday, July 20, 2015. The church works with students at nearby Walnut Creek Elementary School, an almost all-minority and high poverty school that resulted from Wake County dialing back on the use of busing for diversity. Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com

Watching, with worry, loss of diversity in Wake schools

August 27, 2015 06:10 PM

UPDATED August 28, 2015 07:05 AM

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