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  • Lost Class Ring Returned More Than Forty Years Later

    Steve Prutsman of Treasure Isle Jewelers in Cary, N.C. returned a class ring to Deborah Burdette, who’s father Moultrie Watts lost the ring more than 40 years ago at the Outer Banks. The ring was found at the Outer Banks by one of Prutsman’s customers who found the ring with a metal detector.

Steve Prutsman of Treasure Isle Jewelers in Cary, N.C. returned a class ring to Deborah Burdette, who’s father Moultrie Watts lost the ring more than 40 years ago at the Outer Banks. The ring was found at the Outer Banks by one of Prutsman’s customers who found the ring with a metal detector. Robert Willett rwillett@newsobserver.com
Steve Prutsman of Treasure Isle Jewelers in Cary, N.C. returned a class ring to Deborah Burdette, who’s father Moultrie Watts lost the ring more than 40 years ago at the Outer Banks. The ring was found at the Outer Banks by one of Prutsman’s customers who found the ring with a metal detector. Robert Willett rwillett@newsobserver.com

Memories from recovered class ring worth more than gold – Banov

September 01, 2016 10:25 AM

UPDATED September 02, 2016 03:27 PM

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