Tom McDonald holds an old peanut can containing the ashes of his friend, Roy Riegel, at his home in New York, April 14, 2017. McDonald is memorializing fellow Mets fan Riegel, who died nine years ago, by flushing his ashes down public restroom toilets in ballparks between innings. "For Roy, this is the perfect tribute to a plumber and a baseball fan and just a brilliant, wild guy," McDonald said.
Tom McDonald holds an old peanut can containing the ashes of his friend, Roy Riegel, at his home in New York, April 14, 2017. McDonald is memorializing fellow Mets fan Riegel, who died nine years ago, by flushing his ashes down public restroom toilets in ballparks between innings. "For Roy, this is the perfect tribute to a plumber and a baseball fan and just a brilliant, wild guy," McDonald said. JOHN TAGGART NYT
Tom McDonald holds an old peanut can containing the ashes of his friend, Roy Riegel, at his home in New York, April 14, 2017. McDonald is memorializing fellow Mets fan Riegel, who died nine years ago, by flushing his ashes down public restroom toilets in ballparks between innings. "For Roy, this is the perfect tribute to a plumber and a baseball fan and just a brilliant, wild guy," McDonald said. JOHN TAGGART NYT

He’s flushed his friend down 16 ballpark toilets. Now, Durham will be last

May 09, 2017 02:03 PM

UPDATED May 09, 2017 06:01 PM

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