Boy Scout Josh Fernandez, 15, of Fayetteville, left, and his father, Jason, right, put a second coat of Olive Drab "O.D." U.S. Army green paint on a replica Curtis P40 Warhawk WW-II era plane, which is on display at the Gilliam-McConnell Airfield in Carthage, N.C. Fernandez is working toward his Eagle Scout rank in the Boy Scouts.
Boy Scout Josh Fernandez, 15, of Fayetteville, left, and his father, Jason, right, put a second coat of Olive Drab "O.D." U.S. Army green paint on a replica Curtis P40 Warhawk WW-II era plane, which is on display at the Gilliam-McConnell Airfield in Carthage, N.C. Fernandez is working toward his Eagle Scout rank in the Boy Scouts. Corey Lowenstein clowenst@newsobserver.com
Boy Scout Josh Fernandez, 15, of Fayetteville, left, and his father, Jason, right, put a second coat of Olive Drab "O.D." U.S. Army green paint on a replica Curtis P40 Warhawk WW-II era plane, which is on display at the Gilliam-McConnell Airfield in Carthage, N.C. Fernandez is working toward his Eagle Scout rank in the Boy Scouts. Corey Lowenstein clowenst@newsobserver.com

In Carthage, future Eagle Scout’s project pays homage to aviation, local hero

April 09, 2015 05:39 PM

UPDATED April 09, 2015 10:26 PM

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