Dewey Alley, 88, recalls delivering telegrams with news of soldiers’ deaths while in high school during World War II. He went on to operate a successful building supply company and build his own home at North Ridge Country Club, but the experience never left him.
Dewey Alley, 88, recalls delivering telegrams with news of soldiers’ deaths while in high school during World War II. He went on to operate a successful building supply company and build his own home at North Ridge Country Club, but the experience never left him. Josh Shaffer jshaffer@newsobserver.com
Dewey Alley, 88, recalls delivering telegrams with news of soldiers’ deaths while in high school during World War II. He went on to operate a successful building supply company and build his own home at North Ridge Country Club, but the experience never left him. Josh Shaffer jshaffer@newsobserver.com

He carried news of every soldier’s death and consoled every widow. The memories still haunt him.

November 10, 2017 11:46 AM

UPDATED November 11, 2017 10:30 PM

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