Born to slaves in Columbus County, Millie-Christine McCoy traveled the world as a 19th-century curiosity, singing and dancing for royalty. Dubbed “The Two-Headed Nightingale,” they strangely remain less well-known than Chang and Eng Bunker, North Carolina’s better-recognized conjoined twins.
Born to slaves in Columbus County, Millie-Christine McCoy traveled the world as a 19th-century curiosity, singing and dancing for royalty. Dubbed “The Two-Headed Nightingale,” they strangely remain less well-known than Chang and Eng Bunker, North Carolina’s better-recognized conjoined twins. N.C. ARCHIVES
Born to slaves in Columbus County, Millie-Christine McCoy traveled the world as a 19th-century curiosity, singing and dancing for royalty. Dubbed “The Two-Headed Nightingale,” they strangely remain less well-known than Chang and Eng Bunker, North Carolina’s better-recognized conjoined twins. N.C. ARCHIVES

Shaffer: NC’s other famous conjoined twins all but forgotten

May 03, 2015 06:10 PM

UPDATED May 06, 2015 06:10 AM

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