Clarence Perry Bristol, great-great-granfather of the columnist, who fought with the 15th Illinois Infantry and later served as a lieutenant with the 66th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry. His brother, Seneca, the columnist’s great-great-great-uncle, died in the fight at Fort Donelson. The columnist knew little of this before Thursday.
Clarence Perry Bristol, great-great-granfather of the columnist, who fought with the 15th Illinois Infantry and later served as a lieutenant with the 66th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry. His brother, Seneca, the columnist’s great-great-great-uncle, died in the fight at Fort Donelson. The columnist knew little of this before Thursday. Shaffer family
Clarence Perry Bristol, great-great-granfather of the columnist, who fought with the 15th Illinois Infantry and later served as a lieutenant with the 66th Regiment, U.S. Colored Infantry. His brother, Seneca, the columnist’s great-great-great-uncle, died in the fight at Fort Donelson. The columnist knew little of this before Thursday. Shaffer family

A memorial for a Union soldier in my attic

May 24, 2015 04:52 PM

UPDATED May 25, 2015 12:53 AM

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