A picture dated in 1935 shows German Nazi’s parading down a street. In Germany, where the swastika elicits Adolf Hitler’s final solution and the systematic murder of six million Jews and 5 million others, Nazi symbols are rarely seen today. The conquering allies banned their display in October 1945; the new Federal Republic of Germany enshrined that ban in German law in 1949.
A picture dated in 1935 shows German Nazi’s parading down a street. In Germany, where the swastika elicits Adolf Hitler’s final solution and the systematic murder of six million Jews and 5 million others, Nazi symbols are rarely seen today. The conquering allies banned their display in October 1945; the new Federal Republic of Germany enshrined that ban in German law in 1949. - AFP/Getty Images
A picture dated in 1935 shows German Nazi’s parading down a street. In Germany, where the swastika elicits Adolf Hitler’s final solution and the systematic murder of six million Jews and 5 million others, Nazi symbols are rarely seen today. The conquering allies banned their display in October 1945; the new Federal Republic of Germany enshrined that ban in German law in 1949. - AFP/Getty Images

How Germany dealt with its symbols of hate

July 30, 2015 7:42 PM