Richard DeLosSantos, an election clerk, prepares voting booths at the Metropolitan Multi-Services Center in Houston, May 27, 2014. The Supreme Court on May 26, 2015, agreed to hear a case that will answer a long-contested question about a bedrock principle of the American political system: the meaning of “one person one vote.”
Richard DeLosSantos, an election clerk, prepares voting booths at the Metropolitan Multi-Services Center in Houston, May 27, 2014. The Supreme Court on May 26, 2015, agreed to hear a case that will answer a long-contested question about a bedrock principle of the American political system: the meaning of “one person one vote.” CODY DUTY NEW YORK TIMES FILE PHOTO
Richard DeLosSantos, an election clerk, prepares voting booths at the Metropolitan Multi-Services Center in Houston, May 27, 2014. The Supreme Court on May 26, 2015, agreed to hear a case that will answer a long-contested question about a bedrock principle of the American political system: the meaning of “one person one vote.” CODY DUTY NEW YORK TIMES FILE PHOTO

Supreme Court to weigh meaning of ‘one person, one vote’

May 26, 2015 09:49 PM

UPDATED May 26, 2015 11:07 PM

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