Josh Outlaw, left, uses a plasma torch to cut a piece of steel as fellow students look on during a metal-working class at Scotland County High School in Laurinburg, N.C., on Sept. 23, 2016. To address lagging growth in smaller metropolitan areas, some people suggest policies that foster manufacturing jobs, expand work-based training programs and provide more support for community college and strong industry input in designing its curriculum.
Josh Outlaw, left, uses a plasma torch to cut a piece of steel as fellow students look on during a metal-working class at Scotland County High School in Laurinburg, N.C., on Sept. 23, 2016. To address lagging growth in smaller metropolitan areas, some people suggest policies that foster manufacturing jobs, expand work-based training programs and provide more support for community college and strong industry input in designing its curriculum. Chuck Liddy cliddy@newsobserver.com
Josh Outlaw, left, uses a plasma torch to cut a piece of steel as fellow students look on during a metal-working class at Scotland County High School in Laurinburg, N.C., on Sept. 23, 2016. To address lagging growth in smaller metropolitan areas, some people suggest policies that foster manufacturing jobs, expand work-based training programs and provide more support for community college and strong industry input in designing its curriculum. Chuck Liddy cliddy@newsobserver.com

Why NC’s pattern of growth may now be hurting the state

October 24, 2017 04:07 PM

UPDATED October 24, 2017 04:13 PM

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