A bald eagle in Georgia: Eagles prey on American coots, which dine almost exclusively on hydrilla, an invasive aquatic plant. Bacteria that can grow on the underside of hydrilla leaves contain a powerful toxin that infects waterfowl – including coots.
A bald eagle in Georgia: Eagles prey on American coots, which dine almost exclusively on hydrilla, an invasive aquatic plant. Bacteria that can grow on the underside of hydrilla leaves contain a powerful toxin that infects waterfowl – including coots. BRIGETTE HARAM University of Georgia
A bald eagle in Georgia: Eagles prey on American coots, which dine almost exclusively on hydrilla, an invasive aquatic plant. Bacteria that can grow on the underside of hydrilla leaves contain a powerful toxin that infects waterfowl – including coots. BRIGETTE HARAM University of Georgia

Bald eagles, flourishing in Southeast, face bacteria serial killer

March 01, 2015 03:00 PM

UPDATED March 04, 2015 04:50 PM

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