This undated photo provided by Christopher Austin in May 2018 shows a prehensile tailed skink (Prasinohaema prehensicauda) from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea. The high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin in the blood overwhelms the crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. (Christopher Austin via AP)
This undated photo provided by Christopher Austin in May 2018 shows a prehensile tailed skink (Prasinohaema prehensicauda) from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea. The high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin in the blood overwhelms the crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. (Christopher Austin via AP)
This undated photo provided by Christopher Austin in May 2018 shows a prehensile tailed skink (Prasinohaema prehensicauda) from the highlands of New Papua New Guinea. The high concentrations of the green bile pigment biliverdin in the blood overwhelms the crimson color of red blood cells resulting in a lime-green coloration of the muscles, bones, and mucosal tissues. (Christopher Austin via AP)

Correction: Science Says-Green-Blooded Lizard story

May 23, 2018 10:51 AM