Taking a lesson from the way human skin can wrinkle, Xuanhe Zhao, Duke University assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, developed a nanofilm that – spread on a pre-stretched surface and then allowed to relax – creates a microscopic landscape with a precise pattern of high peaks and low valleys. The method produces large-area surface patterns faster, cheaper and with more precision than existing approaches.
Taking a lesson from the way human skin can wrinkle, Xuanhe Zhao, Duke University assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, developed a nanofilm that – spread on a pre-stretched surface and then allowed to relax – creates a microscopic landscape with a precise pattern of high peaks and low valleys. The method produces large-area surface patterns faster, cheaper and with more precision than existing approaches. user Changyong Cao and Xuanhe Zhao
Taking a lesson from the way human skin can wrinkle, Xuanhe Zhao, Duke University assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science, developed a nanofilm that – spread on a pre-stretched surface and then allowed to relax – creates a microscopic landscape with a precise pattern of high peaks and low valleys. The method produces large-area surface patterns faster, cheaper and with more precision than existing approaches. user Changyong Cao and Xuanhe Zhao

New wrinkles in studying wrinkles

May 31, 2015 4:00 PM

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