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  • College campus protests to block speakers are part of growing concerns over state of First Amendment rightsnew

    Those who study history and the Constitution say they're seeing a trend in America that could threaten a principle at the heart of our democracy. As seen at colleges like UC Berkeley this past year, students, teachers, parents and lawmakers are refusing to listen and often blocking others from sharing ideas they don't agree with -- often through protests. The ability of some protesters to block controversial speakers from campus, including Milo Yiannopoulous and Ann Coulter, has raised the question: how do we protect the First Amendment?

College campus protests to block speakers are part of growing concerns over state of First Amendment rightsnew

Those who study history and the Constitution say they're seeing a trend in America that could threaten a principle at the heart of our democracy. As seen at colleges like UC Berkeley this past year, students, teachers, parents and lawmakers are refusing to listen and often blocking others from sharing ideas they don't agree with -- often through protests. The ability of some protesters to block controversial speakers from campus, including Milo Yiannopoulous and Ann Coulter, has raised the question: how do we protect the First Amendment?
Meta Viers/McClatchy