“Fortunately,” writes Heather Redding, “a different path to removing public Confederate monuments might actually exist, thanks to the N.C. General Assembly’s unwitting handiwork.”
“Fortunately,” writes Heather Redding, “a different path to removing public Confederate monuments might actually exist, thanks to the N.C. General Assembly’s unwitting handiwork.” Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com
“Fortunately,” writes Heather Redding, “a different path to removing public Confederate monuments might actually exist, thanks to the N.C. General Assembly’s unwitting handiwork.” Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com

Did the NC General Assembly accidentally make public Confederate monuments illegal?

October 12, 2017 2:51 PM

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