Dallas Woodhouse, executive director of the N.C. Republican party, left, and N.C. Republican Sen. Bob Rucho hold a press conference outside the N.C. Board of Elections building in Raleigh Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 30, 2016. Woodhouse has said he will not apologize for the GOP’s wrongful allegations that some voters committed voter fraud. “We have no apologies to make, and we will keep doing this,” Woodhouse said. He added, “If the standard is that you have to be 100 percent correct or you can never raise a question, that is a standard that is unreasonably and can never be met.”
Dallas Woodhouse, executive director of the N.C. Republican party, left, and N.C. Republican Sen. Bob Rucho hold a press conference outside the N.C. Board of Elections building in Raleigh Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 30, 2016. Woodhouse has said he will not apologize for the GOP’s wrongful allegations that some voters committed voter fraud. “We have no apologies to make, and we will keep doing this,” Woodhouse said. He added, “If the standard is that you have to be 100 percent correct or you can never raise a question, that is a standard that is unreasonably and can never be met.” Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com
Dallas Woodhouse, executive director of the N.C. Republican party, left, and N.C. Republican Sen. Bob Rucho hold a press conference outside the N.C. Board of Elections building in Raleigh Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 30, 2016. Woodhouse has said he will not apologize for the GOP’s wrongful allegations that some voters committed voter fraud. “We have no apologies to make, and we will keep doing this,” Woodhouse said. He added, “If the standard is that you have to be 100 percent correct or you can never raise a question, that is a standard that is unreasonably and can never be met.” Chris Seward cseward@newsobserver.com

NC GOP should have to answer for wrong claims about voter fraud

April 23, 2017 01:54 PM

UPDATED April 23, 2017 04:39 PM

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