Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

7/21 Letters: Are party lines more important than representatives to Sens. Tillis and Burr?

Regarding “2 more GOP senators oppose health bill, killing it for now” (July 18): Thanks are due to U.S. Sens. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and Jerry Moran, R-Kan., for not supporting the passage of the GOP health care reform legislation that was roundly criticized by physician groups, medical insurers and hospitals as potentially disastrous for the country. With so many of their Republican colleagues in the Senate apparently ready to vote for this bill regardless of its many flaws, I have to wonder if North Carolina Sens. Richard Burr and Thom Tillis were at the ready to support it as well.

Letters to the Editor

7/21 Letters: ‘More government support needed’ in guaranteeing affordable housing

Many thanks to the excellent column “The poor are pawns in the real estate chess game of the rich” (July 10) about the disappearance of affordable housing for the poor and elderly in Raleigh, including the disgraceful eviction of old people from the Sir Walter Raleigh hotel. Some other cities, Seattle for one, are working with developers to provide housing for low- and moderate-income people. Raleigh must do the same.

Letters to the Editor

7/20 Letters: healthcare ‘should not be a tax bill’

Regarding “Senate releases health care bill, meets backlash” (July 1): Health insurance is more than a policy; it’s peace of mind. It’s knowing your family will be cared for and not having to worry about going broke when anyone gets sick. That is why I strongly opposed the present Senate health care bill. The more I learned about it, the less I like it.

Letters to the Editor

7/19 Letters: When it comes to job creation, don’t forget rural areas

Regarding “Infosys to hire 2,000 in Wake County” (July 6): It’s tremendous that Wake County continues to receive commitments from international companies like Infosys, Credit Suisse and others to bring jobs to the area. But let’s not forget rural areas of the state where unemployment rates continue to remain stagnant, including Edgecombe and Scotland counties, which lead the way at 7.8 percent. The Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina, N.C. Department of Commerce and other state agencies need to think outside the box in an effort to spur significant economic development in economically depressed areas of the state.

Letters to the Editor

7/16 Letters: Social barriers are made to be broken

Poor David Brooks – fretting about rich people again and “the social barriers that segregate the lower 80 percent” from the upper 20 in “How a cloistered upper-middle class raises barriers to social mobility” (July 13). These barriers apparently include tastes in tea, wine, baby carriages and sandwiches with unpronounceable names.

Letters to the Editor

7/15 Letters: Chapel hill’s unaffordability echoes the ‘same story’ in other states

There is a longstanding child advocacy adage: “Who’s for kids, and who’s just kidding?” This came to mind while reading “Parents of ‘medically fragile’ children fear health care at risk” (July 2) on how medically fragile children might fare under the proposed federal cuts to Medicaid. The offices of both North Carolina senators reported that they support protecting these vulnerable children from the proposed cuts in coverage. They are in an effective position to do so, since the Senate’s leaders are looking for votes to pass a bill and appear willing to negotiate.

Letters to the Editor

7/13 Letters: ‘Social identity,’ not best interests, drive rural voters

Regarding “In mountain town, GOP base fears repeal effort faltering” (July 10): The examples show that citizens in Mark Meadows’s district, while receiving Obamacare, still voted for Trump and would do so again. They also will continue to support representative Meadows. Meadows heads the super-conservative Freedom Caucus, a major proponent of totally abolishing most major benefits found in Obamacare. Although 44,000 people in Meadows’s district are on Obamacare, he carried it by a wide margin.

Letters to the Editor

7/11 Letters: political bias could ‘destroy America from within’

The timely article “Americans debate democracy’s fate” (July 3) questions the survival of the government so many built and died for. America is heading down a deep and perilous path, one that will test the full extent of the country as a republic. More importantly, residents will be tested as Americans, as a people that can meet challenges with rational solutions and foresight to anticipate the needs of the future.

Letters to the Editor

7/10 Letters: Family planning access could help reduce chance of famine

The article “The crisis we’re not talking about” (July 3): reminds us that the world must prevent a possible famine in South Sudan, Somalia, Yemen and Nigeria. No doubt, every possible resource should be used to eliminate starvation throughout the world. The failure of crops and strife in the subject area certainly contribute to the possibly of famine, but there is a more underlying problem that needs to be addressed if future famines are to be averted.

Letters to the Editor

7/7 Letters: Hunger relief should take precedent over arms deals

Regarding “The crisis we’re not talking about” (July 3): The lack of international hunger relief funding for Yemen, South Sudan, Nigeria and Somalia affecting 20 million people is very disturbing. Civil wars in those countries have resulted in a disruption of agricultural production that is exacerbated by lack of rainfall in some places. In Yemen, more than 10,000 people have been killed in a civil war between government forces and Houthi rebels with bombing by Saudi Arabia of rebel held areas. That bombing has destroyed health, water and sanitation infrastructure leading to the massive cholera epidemic mentioned in the article.

Letters to the Editor

7/6 Letters: Wind energy moratorium bill not compromise, but ‘deal breaker’

Just who are they fooling? “Ban on wind energy reduced to 18 months” (July 3) references a proposed ban on wind energy projects in North Carolina. The four-year ban was reduced to an 18-month moratorium under a renewable-energy bill that passed the N.C. legislature. Sounds like a great compromise? Well not really. Republicans argued the ban is needed to provide time to ensure wind towers don’t interfere with military flight training. Would wind companies make a large investment without checking this?

Videos

Coast Guard helicopter crew rescues man from Navy ship 160 miles off NC coast

A U.S. Coast Guard crew medevacs a 60-year-old crew member off a Navy supply ship about 160 miles off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina on Saturday, July 22, 2017.
United States Coast Guard
Coast Guard helicopter crew rescues man from Navy ship 160 miles off NC coast 0:54

Coast Guard helicopter crew rescues man from Navy ship 160 miles off NC coast

A Raleigh pioneer’s legacy fades from view 1:20

A Raleigh pioneer’s legacy fades from view

ACLU challenges the “bathroom bill” reform 0:49

ACLU challenges the “bathroom bill” reform

Blessed by the Pope, this cornerstone is now in Raleigh 1:10

Blessed by the Pope, this cornerstone is now in Raleigh