Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Lynn Mitchell Kohn: Fracking wastes water

In the Aug. 19 Point of View “How fracking fights terrorism,” Mark Cares said fracking plays an important role in the “global war on terror” by keeping energy prices low, thus depriving groups of much-needed revenue. This claim comes as another argument for fracking, its role in combating climate change, is being discredited.

Letters to the Editor

Linda Sones Feinberg: Yep, N&O bias sure showing

Your article about the FBI recovering Hillary Clinton’s emails regarding Benghazi was labeled with huge attention-getting bold letters. Next to that article in very small print was an item about how Donald Trump lost his latest bid to derail a lawsuit by students accusing Trump of fraud. Please try not to be so obvious about having a Republican bias.

Letters to the Editor

Gretchen Daub Westman: Teachers not ‘better off’

Regarding the Aug. 25 letter “Teachers ahead”: Sen. Bob Rucho touted the fact that teachers can now “opt to claim a state tax deduction for purchasing classroom supplies up to $250.” He stated that the teacher in question came out “thousands of dollars better off” since her salary had increased, even though she spent an extra $27 on taxes for the school supplies she purchased despite the lack of a sales tax holiday weekend.

Letters to the Editor

Randall Rickman: Waiting for facts

The Aug. 27 article “Witness: Roadblock preceded fatal shooting of deaf driver” would be disturbing to just about everyone but is particularly so for a deaf person like me. Regardless of the legal outcome of the trooper’s case, can the Highway Patrol at least acknowledge that the vision of Daniel Harris lying lifeless on a street in his own neighborhood is regrettable?

Letters to the Editor

Robert Idol: Unconvinced dim bulbs

In his Aug. 23 Point of View “The why of Democratic professors,” William Snider says, in essence, move along folks, there’s nothing to see at UNC just because Democratic faculty members happen to outnumber Republicans 12:1. No discrimination against Republican job candidates here!

Letters to the Editor

Donald van der Vaart: Protecting North Carolina’s environment

Regarding the Aug. 14 editorial “Water at risk due to weak regulation”: Today North Carolina’s public water supply is the safest it has ever been thanks to increased monitoring and tightened regulations. We are a national model for notifying customers when lead and copper exceed allowable levels. In fact, we have requested that the EPA adopt North Carolina’s rule for notifying customers within 48 hours, rather than 30 days as federal rules allow. We remain unsatisfied with the failed policies of the past and are searching for more effective means of reducing nutrients in our lakes. For the first time, the state environmental department has developed a nutrient-management plan approved by the EPA. Additionally, the McCrory administration was commended by the Obama administration’s EPA for updating North Carolina’s water quality standards after a required review was neglected by the Perdue regime.

Letters to the Editor

Ralph M Perhac: Not a random ratio

Regarding the Aug. 23 Point of View “Berger’s right: Most UNC professors are Democrats. Here’s why”: That Democrats outnumber Republicans(12:1) among UNC faculty is not a result of discrimination during hiring, according to Professor William Snider. He knows of no cases when the political leaning of a candidate arises during the interview/application process. He avers that one reason for the imbalance is a result of the “anti-science attitude adopted” by many Republicans.

Letters to the Editor

Alexander Anderson: A political messiah

Regarding the Aug. 23 opinion piece “Falwell:Trump the Churchillian leader we need”: The Rev Jerry Falwell, like many on the American right, invokes the name Churchill in a manner that shows scant knowledge of British history. Prior to entering Westminster Abbey in his coffin, Sir Winston rarely encountered church except when signing his name.

Videos

Darryl Howard, a free man, hugs his wife after two 1995 murder convictions are vacated by Durham judge

VIDEO: Judge Hudson’s ruling found that new DNA evidence raised questions of Howard's guilt. Howard, 54, was freed shortly after 3 p.m. Wednesday and reunited with his wife Nannie Howard, who married him several years after he was convicted. “I want to go see my grandchildren, go see my mom and go home,” Howard said.
Chuck Liddy cliddy@newsobserver.com
Darryl Howard, a free man, hugs his wife after two 1995 murder convictions are vacated by Durham judge 0:47

Darryl Howard, a free man, hugs his wife after two 1995 murder convictions are vacated by Durham judge

Darryl Howard thanks his supporters after being released from prison 2:01

Darryl Howard thanks his supporters after being released from prison

NC Industrial Commission signs agreement with US Department of Labor 1:32

NC Industrial Commission signs agreement with US Department of Labor

Now at quarterback for Duke, Daniel Jones 3:30

Now at quarterback for Duke, Daniel Jones