Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor

Mariya Shaikh: Surroundings matter

I agree with the Sept. 27 editorial “Flag-stomping teacher needs a lesson in common sense” reprinted from the Fayetteville Observer. It sums up well by saying that stomping on the flag isn’t a smart teaching technique in a town like Fayetteville. When people take actions as if living in a vacuum with no respect for surroundings, then they are not upholding freedom, but rather displaying stupidity. While all of us are entitled to our opinions, we cannot forget to exhibit responsible citizenship. Protests need not be flagrant disrespect of our surroundings; otherwise, it’s just termed ineffective chaos.

Letters to the Editor

Sheila Knapp: Holding universities accountable in rape cases

Regarding the Sept. 14 news article “Student says she was sexually assaulted by UNC football player”: Recently, a female student at N.C. State was sexually assaulted in a residence hall. The UNC survivor just held a news conference because no charges have been filed, and the district attorney claims the case is still under investigation

Letters to the Editor

Alan Briggs: Well-nourished neighbors

Thank you for the excellent Sept. 26 article Doctors ‘prescribe’ fresh produce with help from food banks. “Food is medicine” is indeed more than a slogan. Many of the most common diseases are diet related. Obesity, hypertension and diabetes are examples. Diabetes, once considered an adult disease, is now common among children and teens.

Letters to the Editor

Edie Szyperski: Unbelievable raises

The Sept. 27 article “NC pension system’s executive director receives $105,464 salary boost” was proof that the unbelievable salary increases are continuing at the Department of the State Treasurer. When I began as a new employee at the department four months ago, I was appalled at the salaries that had recently been paid to people in my office. As an 18-year state employee, I was not used to hearing about $86,000 pay raises! This $105,464 salary boosts takes the cake! I hope that the legislature will confirm that these salaries are warranted under the funds it approved. To know that these salaries are coming out of the pension plan that should be a sacred trust is in my opinion corrupt.

Letters to the Editor

Dennis Palacios: Out of control CEO pay

I have kept up with and read all the news concerning the EpiPen’s price hike and the company’s vain attempts at trying to justify this. Then I read all the news concerning the Wells Fargo fiasco with false accounts and illegal activity in which it was recently fined the largest in Consumer Protection Bureau cases.

Letters to the Editor

David B. Neal: Rule-skirting Burr

Your Sept. 11 news article “3 Senate candidates, 3 views on judicial vacancies”: Sen. Richard Burr’s inability to follow the rules of our Constitution is disturbing. He is just not doing his job. The Constitution clearly states that the president shall make judicial appointments with the advice and consent of the Senate. He has taken an oath of office to support the Constitution, but he prefers to place partisan radical Republican politics ahead of doing his job. He calls himself a conservative, but his statement that the American people deserve a voice in the judicial nomination is laughable. Our Founding Fathers would consider such utter nonsense.

Letters to the Editor

Liz Gallops: BCBS plan a plus for N.C.

Hundreds of thousands of North Carolinians just dodged a bullet and don’t even know it. The Sept. 23 news article “Blue Cross plans to continue offering ACA coverage in all 100 N.C. counties” passed largely unnoticed. Had the decision been different, North Carolina would have yet again been the lead story on the national nightly news.

Letters to the Editor

Susan Cohen: Our uncivilized health care world

When we left for our trip to the UK three weeks ago, the press was full of news about the high cost of EpiPens ($600) and the fact that Aetna was leaving the N.C. health insurance market. Our high cost of pharmaceuticals and health care in general is because we believe in free enterprise and capitalism and that the market will regulate itself. EpiPens cost so much here because it’s what the market will bear, and Aetna most likely left because it was unable to make enough money from providing health care in N.C.

Letters to the Editor

Joseph W. Cece: Obama’s shining light

Watching the opening ceremonies for the National Museum of African American History, I was incredibly moved by the speeches of John Lewis and Barack Obama. I don’t know if or when we will ever see another president who embodies the intellect, judgment and temperament, empathy and sheer humanity possessed by the current occupant of the Oval Office.

Letters to the Editor

Michael Matthews: A number, not a fact

In your Sept. 19 Community Conversations, one contributor stated that there are 94 million Americans out of work. That number is so detached from reality that I have to wonder how they arrived at that number. This number is greater than the 25 percent unemployed rate during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Letters to the Editor

Laurence Marks: Speed bumps would slow drivers

Regarding the Sept. 10 news article “Six drivers have crashed onto his property. Now he wants solutions.”: Six drivers have crashed onto Carlo Bernarte’s property endangering his family and damaging his home. City and state agencies have declined to install a guardrail and have offered no useful solutions. May I offer one? Speed bumps!

Letters to the Editor

Earl Honeycutt: HB2 is ‘pure politics’

In the Sept. 16 news article “McCrory blames politics for HB2 fallout,” Gov. Pat McCrory has the temerity to blame his growing House Bill 2 problems on politics – “I’ve got to assume it’s politics because this is the No. 1 state (in presidential and gubernatorial races in the U.S.).”

Letters to the Editor

Becky Hayes: Lawmakers need to focus on real issues

I have just a few questions for my governor and legislature. I appreciate their concern for our children, and I agree they do need protection, but since we don’t seem to have a problem with transgender folks using the bathrooms in which they identify, would it not make more sense to protect our kids from gun violence, poverty and underfunded public schools?

Videos

Attorney: 'We have facts that support what happened that night was consensual'

Kerry Sutton, attorney for UNC football player Allen Artis, tells reporters that her team has evidence that supports that everything that happened between Artis and accuser Delaney Robinson was consensual. Artis, who is facing charges of sexual battery and assault on a female student says the two had consensual sex and that he did not rape nor drug her.
Jill Knight jhknight@newsobserver.com
Attorney: 'We have facts that support what happened that night was consensual' 1:00

Attorney: 'We have facts that support what happened that night was consensual'

UNC football player Allen Artis says he did not rape or drug his accuser 10:11

UNC football player Allen Artis says he did not rape or drug his accuser

Wake County Schools student voter registration 1:34

Wake County Schools student voter registration

Hillary Clinton says Trump’s foreign policy is ‘dangerously incoherent’ 1:05

Hillary Clinton says Trump’s foreign policy is ‘dangerously incoherent’