In this Oct. 23, 1973 photo, Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. President Donald Trump’s surprise firing of FBI Director James Comey drew swift comparisons to the Nixon-era “Saturday night massacre.” Both cases involve a president getting rid of an official leading an investigation that could ensnare the White House, said Douglas Brinkley, a presidential historian at Rice University.
In this Oct. 23, 1973 photo, Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. President Donald Trump’s surprise firing of FBI Director James Comey drew swift comparisons to the Nixon-era “Saturday night massacre.” Both cases involve a president getting rid of an official leading an investigation that could ensnare the White House, said Douglas Brinkley, a presidential historian at Rice University. Anonymous AP
In this Oct. 23, 1973 photo, Attorney General Elliot L. Richardson speaks during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington. President Donald Trump’s surprise firing of FBI Director James Comey drew swift comparisons to the Nixon-era “Saturday night massacre.” Both cases involve a president getting rid of an official leading an investigation that could ensnare the White House, said Douglas Brinkley, a presidential historian at Rice University. Anonymous AP

The Republicans who took on Richard Nixon

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