FILE- In this Feb. 12, 2014, file photo, Miami Heat's LeBron James, left, drives the ball against Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors know there is no stopping James. But they also know if they’re going to win their first NBA championship they’re going to have to try to contain him.
FILE- In this Feb. 12, 2014, file photo, Miami Heat's LeBron James, left, drives the ball against Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors know there is no stopping James. But they also know if they’re going to win their first NBA championship they’re going to have to try to contain him. Ben Margot AP
FILE- In this Feb. 12, 2014, file photo, Miami Heat's LeBron James, left, drives the ball against Golden State Warriors' Stephen Curry during the second half of an NBA basketball game in Oakland, Calif. The Warriors know there is no stopping James. But they also know if they’re going to win their first NBA championship they’re going to have to try to contain him. Ben Margot AP

Should we expect James and Curry to go 1-on-1 much in NBA Finals?

June 03, 2015 12:15 PM

UPDATED June 03, 2015 08:16 PM

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