Some of the century-old river shacks preservationists are fighting to save, in Hudson, N.Y., Oct. 16, 2017. Once used as year-round residences for fishermen, then as getaways or staging areas for hunters or fishermen, the 17 river shacks are among the last vestiges of “Old Hudson,” a far cry from today’s town known for antique shops and fine dining.
Some of the century-old river shacks preservationists are fighting to save, in Hudson, N.Y., Oct. 16, 2017. Once used as year-round residences for fishermen, then as getaways or staging areas for hunters or fishermen, the 17 river shacks are among the last vestiges of “Old Hudson,” a far cry from today’s town known for antique shops and fine dining. TONY CENICOLA NYT
Some of the century-old river shacks preservationists are fighting to save, in Hudson, N.Y., Oct. 16, 2017. Once used as year-round residences for fishermen, then as getaways or staging areas for hunters or fishermen, the 17 river shacks are among the last vestiges of “Old Hudson,” a far cry from today’s town known for antique shops and fine dining. TONY CENICOLA NYT

Preserving a cluster of fishing shacks from a small city’s ‘forgotten’ past

November 08, 2017 09:35 AM

More Videos

  • They killed a 12-foot, 5-inch, 620-pound alligator. That was the easy part

    Joe Houston and his nephew Scott Houston hunted a huge alligator near the South Carolina coast. They had to use a crossbow, harpoons and a gun to finish the hunt, which took an hour and 45 minutes, before they were able to get the alligator in the boat. Joe Houston is having the meat processed and having the head and other parts mounted.