Conner Stroud of Rutherfordton, N.C., has a non-hereditary birth defect called proximal femoral focal deficiency, or PFFD, that left him without legs. But he can’t remember a time before he played tennis, and he has risen to be one of the world’s top junior wheelchair players. Here he hits a low forehand with one hand while guiding his chair into position with the other.
Conner Stroud of Rutherfordton, N.C., has a non-hereditary birth defect called proximal femoral focal deficiency, or PFFD, that left him without legs. But he can’t remember a time before he played tennis, and he has risen to be one of the world’s top junior wheelchair players. Here he hits a low forehand with one hand while guiding his chair into position with the other. Robert Lahser rlahser@charlotteobserver.com
Conner Stroud of Rutherfordton, N.C., has a non-hereditary birth defect called proximal femoral focal deficiency, or PFFD, that left him without legs. But he can’t remember a time before he played tennis, and he has risen to be one of the world’s top junior wheelchair players. Here he hits a low forehand with one hand while guiding his chair into position with the other. Robert Lahser rlahser@charlotteobserver.com

Inspiring N.C. teen Conner Stroud among world’s best wheelchair tennis players

July 25, 2015 4:44 PM