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North Carolina and Wake County lead US in ‘gold standard’ for teaching profession

Matthew Scialdone, an English teacher at Middle Creek High School, teaches his first class of the day in this 2015 file photo. He’s one of 2,745 Wake County teachers who have received certification from the National Board For Professional Teaching Standards.
Matthew Scialdone, an English teacher at Middle Creek High School, teaches his first class of the day in this 2015 file photo. He’s one of 2,745 Wake County teachers who have received certification from the National Board For Professional Teaching Standards. jhknight@newsobserver.com

North Carolina and the Wake County school system continue to lead the U.S. in what’s considered to be the “gold standard” for teacher excellence with the most number of educators certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

The state now has 21,985 of the 122,034 nationally certified teachers in the U.S., according to new results released Monday. Statewide, 22.1 percent of teachers have gone through the rigorous process to receive their certification.

Wake County had the most certified teachers of any district in the nation with 2,745. Wake has led the nation for 13 consecutive years.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg ranked fourth in the nation with 2,137 certified teachers.

North Carolina has historically led the nation in the number of certified teachers, in part because it comes with a 12 percent annual pay raise from the state.

It costs $1,900 in fees to get certified, and North Carolina provides low-interest loans to teachers to help them go through the process.

Go to https://www.nbpts.org/nbct-search/ to view a directory of nationally certified teachers.

Go to http://www.ncpublicschools.org/nationalboardcertification/ for more information on how North Carolina teachers can get certified.

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T. Keung Hui has covered K-12 education for the News & Observer since 1999, helping parents, students, school employees and the community understand the vital role education plays in North Carolina. His primary focus is Wake County, but he also covers statewide education issues.
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