Books

Raleigh native comes out of the jungle and writes a kids’ book

In “A Rhino to the Rescue” by Cleve Hicks, Ernest Horningway is a well-meaning, slightly bumbling and rather innocent civilized rhinoceros who hears about what is happening to his wild cousins in Africa and goes to meet them.
In “A Rhino to the Rescue” by Cleve Hicks, Ernest Horningway is a well-meaning, slightly bumbling and rather innocent civilized rhinoceros who hears about what is happening to his wild cousins in Africa and goes to meet them. Amazon

​After more than two decades of working in the jungles, Raleigh native and primatologist Cleve Hicks was anxious to share with children his passion for wildlife and conservation.

​“I have spent the past 20 years or so studying chimpanzees, gorillas and other large mammals in tropical Africa,” he says. “Seeing what we are doing to these amazing creatures in the name of greed and ‘progress’ made me want to write and paint a book for children – but one offering some hope.”

​In “A Rhino to the Rescue” (Amazon), Ernest Horningway is a well-meaning, slightly bumbling and rather innocent civilized rhinoceros who hears about what is happening to his wild cousins in Africa and goes to meet them. “Come to think of it,” says Hicks, “that is pretty much my own story, minus the rhinoceros part.”

​Hicks describes the story as reminiscent of “Babar,” but with a twist: Ernest learns some lessons from his wild cousins, which helps him as he joins the fight against rhino-horn smugglers.

​A portion of the sales from the book will be donated to the Black Mambas, a group of South African women who patrol national parks to protect rhinos.

​Hicks is an adjunct professor at the University of Warsaw and a visiting fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig, Germany.

New titles

​In Durham author Denise Heinze’s debut novel, “Sally St. Johns” (BookLocker), Sally is on a mission to save the planet from global warming and to clear her name. Implicated in a terrorist plot to control all sources of energy, Sally draws on her colorful past, an idealistic attorney and an aging mother to bring the real terrorist to justice.

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“Blue Water White Sand” by Joy Hewett traverses Honduras, Florida, Hawaii, California and North Carolina as Debra Bishop and her longtime friend reunite in Key West and get caught up in an unexpected adventure. Silk Hope Press

​“Blue Water White Sand” (Silk Hope Press) traverses Honduras, Florida, Hawaii, California and North Carolina as Debra Bishop and her longtime friend reunite in Key West and get caught up in an unexpected adventure. The novel by Joy Hewett explores the mutability of time and how memory plays a part in who we are. Hewett lives in Chatham County.

​Just in time for summer football camps, “Life on the Line: Football, Rage and Redemption” (Bagpiper press) by Frank McNair is targeted at middle- and high-school sports fans. Full of play-by-play action during grueling practices and often bloody games, it follows the lives of two teenaged boys in 1965 after they meet on the football practice field. McNair, a UNC-Chapel Hill graduate who grew up playing football, lives in Winston-Salem.

​Triangle-area authors: We want to hear about your new book. Send information to bookbeat@newsobserver.com. As space permits, we will mention self-published books by local authors that are for sale on commercial sites.

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